Production Tips: What’s The Best Way To Produce A Track?

0
Post Image

Production is a weird animal. There are lots of ways to do it, and no real “right” or “wrong” way to make the magic happen. So how do you know if you’re doing it the best way possible? I’ve been producing records for 10 years now, but still feel like I’m learning every day. Nonetheless, I wanted to begin to share some of the things I’ve learned and hopefully help you avoid the mistakes I made.

Figure Out The Song First

Everyone’s different, you’ll need to accept that. Some artists will come in with a killer song that you’ve got jack-squat to change and when that happens – consider yourself to be lucky. It won’t happen often, at least on the indie level. Unless you’re working with bands, most individual artists will have half-finished ideas that need to be completed. Do this first. Help them figure out when the song needs to do, what needs to change or be added or – send them home to do it first if you’re not a songwriter. Hell, don’t even schedule the session if you’re not a songwriter and adept enough at helping artists hone the song. It’s totally ok if you’re not – there are plenty of producers who don’t write but are wizards at ProTools, making sounds, beats, engineering, etc. But get the song nailed down first. Don’t even create a click track unless that song is done, and ready to be produced. You will find yourself in a world of uncomfortable situations and will potentially tick off a lot of clients if the song isn’t done. You will mess things up if the song is not done first. Finish the song first. Period.

Continue reading

Horns horny horns horns.

0
Post Image

Recording Horns @ Audio Dallas

Had a great day today cutting some horns at Audio Dallas! My good friend and client Charles Collins needed some alto and tenor sax, bone, and trumpet on a tune today, so I got to arrange and cut horns on “People Make The World Go Round” a revised version of the classic hit for Charles’ new upcoming EP.

The song itself is pretty hairy. Lots of meter changes, and the horns play a very important role in the recording. Alto sax took the lead, and then tenor sax, bone and trumpet filled out the vibe. Thankfully I had Randy Lee on sax (whom I’d never worked with before – amazing player) Gaika James on trombone and Keith Jourdan on trumpet. I’ve worked with Gaika and Keith several times before and they’re really solid players; some of my favorite to work with in town. Being a horn player myself (I started on trombone) I’m pretty particular when I’m cutting horns. Although Charles is producing the EP himself, he’ll let me chime in when I hear something weird, not that I had to that often.
Continue reading